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Defects and device performanceThe necessity for a low-cost crystalline silicon sheet material for photovoltaics has generated a number of alternative crystal growth techniques that would replace Czochralski (Cz) and float-zone (FZ) technologies. Efficiencies of devices fabricated from low resistivity FZ silicon are approaching 20%, and it is highly likely that this value will be superseded in the near future. However, FZ silicon is expensive, and is unlikely ever to be used for photovoltaics. Cz silicon has many of the desirable qualities of FZ except that minority-carrier lifetimes at lower resistivities are significantly less than those of FZ silicon. Even with Cz silicon, it is unlikely that cost goals can be met because of the poor-material yield that results from sawing and other aspects of the crystal rowth. Although other silicon sheet technologies have been investigated, almost all have characteristics that limit efficiency to approx. 16%. In summary, 20% efficient solar cells can likely be fabricated from both FZ and Cz silicon, but costs are likely to be ultimately unacceptable. Alternate silicon technologies are not likely to achieve this goal, but cost per watt figures may be eventually better than either of the single crystal technologies and may rival any thin-film technology.
Document ID
19860010267
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Storti, G.
(Storti (George), Washington, DC, United States)
Armstrong, R.
(Storti (George), Washington, DC, United States)
Johnson, S.
(Storti (George), Washington, DC, United States)
Lin, H. C.
(Storti (George), Washington, DC, United States)
Regnault, W.
(Storti (George), Washington, DC, United States)
Yoo, K. C.
(Storti (George), Washington, DC, United States)
Date Acquired
August 12, 2013
Publication Date
August 15, 1985
Publication Information
Publication: JPL Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Workshop
Subject Category
Solid-State Physics
Accession Number
86N19738
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.
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