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Dielectric measurement using an open ended coaxial line with an extended center conductorPermittivity may be determined by measuring the complex reflection coefficient of an open-ended coaxial line placed in contact with a test sample. This method works best for liquid samples. For the measurement of non-liquid materials problems can arise. A perfect preparation is needed to provide a good contact between the tip and the dielectric medium. At times, the dimension of the sensor cannot be freely chosen, as is the case for the measurement of the dielectric constant of the xylem layer of a living tree. The influence of the installation of the sensor on a tree's water status must be minimized by using a small sensor. In such cases the capacitance cannot be optimized. By extending the center conductor of the open-ended coaxial line, some of these problems can be avoided. This provides an additional tool to tune the capacitance of the sensor by adjusting the length of the extension. Therefore the measurement accuracy can be optimized. The sensor also becomes sensitive to a larger volume. A comparative study of a flush and extended tipped probes shows that the ability to measure the dielectric constant of trees has been notably increased due to the extension of the center conductor.
Document ID
19930063670
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Wegmueller, Urs (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Guerra, Abel G. (JPL Pasadena, CA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 16, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1992
Publication Information
Publication: In: IGARSS '92; Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Houston, TX, May 26-29, 1992. Vol. 1 (A93-47551 20-43)
Subject Category
INSTRUMENTATION AND PHOTOGRAPHY
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other

Related Records

IDRelationTitle19930063554Analytic PrimaryIGARSS '92; Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Houston, TX, May 26-29, 1992. Vols. 1 & 2