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Radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forestThe radiative transfer theory is applied to interpret polarimetric radar backscatter from pine forest with clustered vegetation structures. The scattering function of each cluster is calculated by incorporating the phase interference of scattered fields from each component. The resulting phase matrix is used in the radiative transfer equations to evaluate the polarimetric backscattering coefficients from random medium layers embedded with vegetation clusters. Upon including multiscale structures (trunks, primary and secondary branches, and needles), polarimetric radar responses from pine forest for different frequencies and looking angles are interpreted and simulated. Preliminary results are shown to be in good agreement with the measured backscattering coefficients at the Landes maritime pine forest during the MAESTRO-1 experiment.
Document ID
19930063862
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Hsu, C. C. (NASA Headquarters Washington, DC United States)
Han, H. C. (NASA Headquarters Washington, DC United States)
Shin, R. T. (NASA Headquarters Washington, DC United States)
Kong, J. A. (MIT Cambridge, MA, United States)
Beaudoin, A. (NASA Headquarters Washington, DC United States)
Le Toan, T. (Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements Toulouse, France)
Date Acquired
August 16, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1992
Publication Information
Publication: In: IGARSS '92; Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Houston, TX, May 26-29, 1992. Vol. 2 (A93-47551 20-43)
Subject Category
EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: N00014-89-J-1107
CONTRACT_GRANT: ESA-AO/1-2413/90/NL/PB
CONTRACT_GRANT: NAGW-1617
CONTRACT_GRANT: JPL-958461
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other

Related Records

IDRelationTitle19930063554Analytic PrimaryIGARSS '92; Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Houston, TX, May 26-29, 1992. Vols. 1 & 2