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Atmospheric effects on the NDVI - Strategies for its removalThe compositing technique used to derive global vegetation index (NDVI) from the NOAA AVHRR radiances reduces the residual effect of water vapor and aerosol on the NDVI. The reduction in the atmospheric effect is shown using a comprehensive measured data set for desert conditions, and a simulation for grass with continental aerosol. A statistical analaysis of the probability of occurrence of aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water vapor measured in different climatic regimes is used for this simulation. It is concluded that for a long compositing period (e.g., 27 days), the residual aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water vapor are usually too small to be corrected. For a 9-day compositing, the residual average aerosol effect may be about twice the correction uncertainty. For Landsat TM or Earth Observing System Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (EOS-MODIS) data, the newly defined atmospherically resistant vegetation index (ARVI) is more promising than possible direct atmospheric correction schemes, except for heavy desert dust conditions.
Document ID
19930063893
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Kaufman, Y. J. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Tanre, D. (Lille II, Univ. Villeneuve-d'Ascq, France)
Holben, B. N. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Markham, B. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Gitelson, A. (Negev Univ. Sde-Boker, Israel)
Date Acquired
August 16, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1992
Publication Information
Publication: In: IGARSS '92; Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Houston, TX, May 26-29, 1992. Vol. 2 (A93-47551 20-43)
Subject Category
EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other

Related Records

IDRelationTitle19930063554Analytic PrimaryIGARSS '92; Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Houston, TX, May 26-29, 1992. Vols. 1 & 2