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Direction angle sensitivity of agricultural field backscatter with Airsar dataThe direction angle sensitivity of agricultural field backscatter is studied. The direction angle is defined as the angle between the incident plane and the perpendicular to the row direction. Maximum backscatter power from an angricultural field is expected to occur when the furrow induced slopes are oriented towards the radar, i.e., for a 0 deg direction angle. This effect is known as the cardinal effect. Because of the way the looks are formed in the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) processor, each look corresponds to a slightly different squint angle. This provides a unique data set to analyze the cardinal effect, as it allows simultaneous observations of the backscatter of a field for sixteen different direction angles. The backscatter variations of the agricultural fields with direction angle at P-, L-, and C-bands is described. The observed variations in backscatter are compared with model predictions. The model predicts that the maximum backscatter occurs for a 0 deg direction angle, but underestimates the backscatter variations with direction angle by more than 10 dB.
Document ID
19930064016
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Dubois, Pascale C. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Rignot, Eric (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Van Zyl, Jakob J. (JPL Pasadena, CA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 16, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1992
Publication Information
Publication: In: IGARSS '92; Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Houston, TX, May 26-29, 1992. Vol. 2 (A93-47551 20-43)
Subject Category
EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other

Related Records

IDRelationTitle19930063554Analytic PrimaryIGARSS '92; Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Houston, TX, May 26-29, 1992. Vols. 1 & 2