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Logistics resupply and emergency crew return system for Space Station FreedomSometime in the late 1990's, if all goes according to plan, Space Station Freedom will allow the United States and its cooperating partners to maintain a permanent presence in space. Acting as a scientific base of operations, it will also serve as a way station for future explorations of the Moon and perhaps even Mars. Systems onboard the station will have longer lifetimes, higher reliability, and lower maintenance requirements than seen on any previous space flight vehicle. Accordingly, the station will have to be resupplied with consumables (air, water, food, etc.) and other equipment changeouts (experiments, etc.) on a periodic basis. Waste materials and other products will also be removed from the station for return to Earth. The availability of a Logistics Resupply Module (LRM), akin to the Soviet's Progress vehicle, would help to accomplish these tasks. Riding into orbit on an expendable launch vehicle, the LRM would be configured to rendezvous autonomously and dock with the space station. After the module is emptied of its cargo, waste material from the space station would be loaded back into it. The module would then begin its descent to a recovery point on Earth. Logistics Resupply Modules could be configured in a variety of forms depending on the type of cargo being transferred. If the LRM's were cycled to the space station in such a way that at least one vehicle remained parked at the station at all times, the modules could serve double duty as crew emergency return capsules. A pressurized LRM could then bring two or more crew-persons requiring immediate return (because of health problems, system failure, or unavoidable catastrophes) back to Earth. Large cost savings would be accrued by combining the crew return function with a logistics resupply system.
Document ID
19940004523
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Ahne, D.
(Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign Savoy, IL, United States)
Caldwell, D.
(Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign Savoy, IL, United States)
Davis, K.
(Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign Savoy, IL, United States)
Delmedico, S.
(Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign Savoy, IL, United States)
Heinen, E.
(Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign Savoy, IL, United States)
Ismail, S.
(Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign Savoy, IL, United States)
Sumner, C.
(Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign Savoy, IL, United States)
Bock, J.
(Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign Savoy, IL, United States)
Buente, B.
(Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign Savoy, IL, United States)
Gliane, R.
(Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign Savoy, IL, United States)
Date Acquired
August 16, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1989
Publication Information
Publication: USRA, NASA(USRA University Advanced Design Program Fifth Annual Summer Conference
Subject Category
Systems Analysis
Accession Number
94N71278
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.
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