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The coherent backscattering opposition effectWe have measured the opposition effect, the nonlinear surge in reflectance seen in particulate materials as phase angle approaches zero degrees, in a suite of materials of varying particle size and reflectance. These samples were illuminated by linearly and circularly polarized monochromatic radiation at two wavelengths, 0.442 and 0.633 microns. By measuring the linear and circular polarization ratios for each sample, we have found that in highly reflective materials the behavior of the reflected radiation is consistent with the coherent backscattering process which has recently been proposed to explain the opposition surge that is seen in such media. The size and width of the coherent backscattering opposition peak vary as a function of reflectance of the sample. The opposition effect has been observed in particulate materials studied in the laboratory and it is also observed in the radiation reflected from solar system bodies which present a regolith to the earth based observer. The traditional explanation of the opposition effect, the shadow-hiding hypothesis, is that it was caused by the elimination of mutual shadows cast between the regolith grains as the phase angle of the observation became smaller. This shadow-hiding hypothesis, however, is unable to explain the opposition effect seen in highly reflective materials such as magnesium oxide and barium sulfate powders. This is because highly reflective media will multiply scatter the incident radiation between the regolith grains. This causes the shadows to be eliminated. We have measured the angular scattering properties of a suite of materials of different reflectivity. We have observed polarization ratios in reflective particulates that are consistent with coherent backscattering as the principal process which causes the opposition surge.
Document ID
19940016173
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Nelson, R. M. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Hapke, B. W. (Pittsburgh Univ. PA., United States)
Smythe, W. D. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Gharakanian, V. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Herrera, P. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Date Acquired
September 6, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1993
Publication Information
Publication: Lunar and Planetary Inst., Twenty-Fourth Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Part 3: N-Z
Subject Category
OPTICS
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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