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Magnetically controlled solar nebulaIt is widely believed that a primordial solar nebula, the precursor of the Sun and its planetary system, could be best described in terms of an accretion disk. Such an accretion disk is though to be turbulent, and it is usually imagined that turbulent viscosity alone provides the torque responsible for the structure and the evolution of the nebula. However, it was found that an MHD dynamo operating in a turbulent nebula can contemporaneously produce magnetic fields capable of significantly altering or even dominating the total torque. Thus, it seems that no model of a viscous solar nebula is complete without taking magnetic fields into consideration. It was demonstrated that there are usually two distinct regions of nebular disk where a dynamo can operate: the inner region, where the magnetic field coupled to gas due to relatively high thermal ionization; and the outer region, where this coupling is achieved due to nonthermal ionization. Most models also show the existence of an intermediate region, 'the magnetic gap,' where neither thermal nor nonthermal sources can produce enough ionization to provide the necessary coupling between the magnetic field and the gas. The location and width of the gap change substantially from one model to another. At present, we can only estimate the strength of a generated magnetic field. It seems that a large-scale magnetic field is likely to be in the equipartition with the turbulent kinetic energy; however, the intense magnetic fluctuations may greatly exceed this equipartition strength on short time and length scales. To show how a dynamo-generated magnetic field changes the structure of a viscous nebula, we consider four nebula models extensively.
Document ID
19940016318
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Stepinski, T. F. (Lunar and Planetary Inst. Houston, TX, United States)
Reyes-Ruiz, M. (Rice Univ. Houston, TX., United States)
Date Acquired
September 6, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1993
Publication Information
Publication: Twenty-Fourth Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Part 3: N-Z
Subject Category
SOLAR PHYSICS
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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