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The Genesis Solar Wind Collection Mission: Current StatusThe NASA Genesis spacecraft was launched August 8, 2001 on a mission to collect samples of solar wind for greater than or equal to 2 years and then return them to Earth in 2004. Detailed analyses of the solar wind ions implanted into high-purity collection substrates will subsequently be carried out in earth-based laboratories using various mass spectrometry techniques. These analyses are expected to determine key isotopic ratios and elemental abundances in the solar wind and, by extension, in the solar photosphere. Further, the photospheric composition is thought to be representative of the solar nebula with a few exceptions so that the Genesis mission will provide a baseline for the average solar nebula composition with which to compare present-day compositions of planets, meteorites, and asteroids. The implications of the solar oxygen isotopic composition have been discussed. A list of other isotopic and elemental measurement objectives, and some of the rationale behind them, is given.
Document ID
20030110686
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Barraclough, B. L. (Los Alamos National Lab. NM, United States)
Wiens, R. C. (Los Alamos National Lab. NM, United States)
Steinberg, J. T. (Los Alamos National Lab. NM, United States)
Dors, E. E. (Los Alamos National Lab. NM, United States)
Neugebauer, M. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Burnett, D. S. (California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Gosling, J. (Los Alamos National Lab. NM, United States)
Bremmer, R. R. (Los Alamos National Lab. NM, United States)
Date Acquired
August 21, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 2003
Publication Information
Publication: Lunar and Planetary Science XXXIV
Subject Category
Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Public Use Permitted.

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IDRelationTitle20030110578Analytic PrimaryLunar and Planetary Science XXXIV
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