NASA Logo

NTRS

NTRS - NASA Technical Reports Server

Back to Results
Submarine Volcanic Eruptions and Potential Analogs for VenusAs part of an analysis program to better understand the diversity of volcanic processes on the terrestrial planets, an investigation of the volcanic landforms which exist on the Earth's ocean floor was initiated. In part, this analysis is focused toward gaining a better understanding of submarine volcanic landforms in their own right, but also it is hoped that these features may show similarities to volcanic landforms on Venus, due to the high ambient water (Earth) and atmospheric (Venus) pressures. A series of numerical modelling experiments was performed to investigate the relative importance of such attributes as water pressure and temperature on the eruption process, and to determine the rate of cooling and emplacement of lava flows in the submarine environment. Investigations to date show that the confining water pressure and the buoyancy effects of the surrounding water significantly affect the styles of volcanism on the ocean floor. In the case of Venusian volcanism, confining pressures will not be as great as that found at the ocean's abyssal plains, but nevertheless the general trend toward reducing magma vesiculation will hold true for Venus as well as the ocean floor. Furthermore, other analogs may also be found between submarine volcanism and Venusian activity.
Document ID
19850015262
Document Type
Other
Authors
Wilson, L. (Hawaii Univ. Honolulu, HI, United States)
Mouginismark, P. J. (Hawaii Univ. Honolulu, HI, United States)
Fryer, P. (Hawaii Univ. Honolulu, HI, United States)
Gaddis, L. R. (Hawaii Univ. Honolulu, HI, United States)
Date Acquired
August 12, 2013
Publication Date
April 1, 1985
Publication Information
Publication: NASA, Washington Repts. of Planetary Geol. and Geophys. Program
Subject Category
GEOPHYSICS
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

Related Records

IDRelationTitle19850015163Analytic PrimaryReports of Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, 1984
Document Inquiry