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Optical Sensors for Planetary Radiant Energy (OSPREy): Calibration and Validation of Current and Next-Generation NASA Missions
NTRS Full-Text: Click to View  [PDF Size: 2.9 MB]
Author and Affiliation:
Hooker, Stanford B.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Bernhard, Germar(Biospherical Instruments, Inc., San Diego, CA, United States)
Morrow, John H.(Biospherical Instruments, Inc., San Diego, CA, United States)
Booth, Charles R.(Biospherical Instruments, Inc., San Diego, CA, United States)
Comer, Thomas(Biospherical Instruments, Inc., San Diego, CA, United States)
Lind, Randall N.(Biospherical Instruments, Inc., San Diego, CA, United States)
Quang, Vi(Biospherical Instruments, Inc., San Diego, CA, United States)
Abstract: A principal objective of the Optical Sensors for Planetary Radiance Energy (OSPREy) activity is to establish an above-water radiometer system as a lower-cost alternative to existing in-water systems for the collection of ground-truth observations. The goal is to be able to make high-quality measurements satisfying the accuracy requirements for the vicarious calibration and algorithm validation of next-generation satellites that make ocean color and atmospheric measurements. This means the measurements will have a documented uncertainty satisfying the established performance metrics for producing climate-quality data records. The OSPREy approach is based on enhancing commercial-off-the-shelf fixed-wavelength and hyperspectral sensors to create hybridspectral instruments with an improved accuracy and spectral resolution, as well as a dynamic range permitting sea, Sun, sky, and Moon observations. Greater spectral diversity in the ultraviolet (UV) will be exploited to separate the living and nonliving components of marine ecosystems; UV bands will also be used to flag and improve atmospheric correction algorithms in the presence of absorbing aerosols. The short-wave infrared (SWIR) is expected to improve atmospheric correction, because the ocean is radiometrically blacker at these wavelengths. This report describes the development of the sensors, including unique capabilities like three-axis polarimetry; the documented uncertainty will be presented in a subsequent report.
Publication Date: Jul 01, 2012
Document ID:
20130003503
(Acquired Jan 29, 2013)
Subject Category: EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
Report/Patent Number: NASA/TM-2012-215872, GSFC.TM.6907.2012
Document Type: Technical Report
Publication Information: (SEE all subsidiary records)
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NNG08HZ17C
Financial Sponsor: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Organization Source: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Description: 126p; In English; Original contains color and black and white illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Distribution as joint owner in the copyright
NASA Terms: ALGORITHMS; CALIBRATING; OPTICAL MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; RADIOMETERS; RADIANCE; REMOTE SENSING; OCEAN TEMPERATURE; GROUND TRUTH; NASA PROGRAMS; COMMERCIAL OFF-THE-SHELF PRODUCTS; WATER COLOR
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